How to help your child with place value – Part 1

How to help your child with place value - part 1

Place value is a really important aspect of Numeracy which helps to give children a solid foundation in their understanding of number. It also really helps with their written methods and mental maths methods.

What does place value, with whole numbers, look like in each year group?

  • In Year 3, children are working on 3 digit numbers.
  • In Year 4, children are working on 4 digit numbers. However, they may also start to look at 5 digit numbers.
  • In Year 5, children will work with numbers up to 6 digits.
  • In Year 6, children will work with numbers up to 7 digits.

Recognising the value of each digit in a number

Children will work to identify the value of each digit in a number, often through partitioning the number as shown below or by identifying the value of the digit underlined in a number. For example: 386 = the underlined digit is worth 80.

e.g. Year 3: 386 – using the chart below, this shows the 3 is worth 300, the 8 is worth 80 and the 6 is worth 6.

Another way of showing this would be partitioning 386 = 300 + 80 + 6

(H) Hundreds (T) Tens (O) Ones
3 8 6

Year 4: 2784 – using the chart below, this shows the 2 is worth 2000, the 7 is worth 700, the 8 is worth 80 and the 4 is worth 4.

Another way of showing this would be partitioning 2784 = 2000 + 700 + 80 + 4

Th (Thousands) H (Hundreds) T (Tens) O (Ones)
2 7 8 4

Year 5: 78 265 = 70 000 + 8000 + 200 + 60 + 5

TTh (Ten Thousands) Th (Thousands) H (Hundreds) T (Tens) O (Ones)
7 8 2 6 5

824 361 = 800 000 + 20 000 + 4000 + 300 + 60 + 1

HTh (Hundred

Thousands)

TTh (Ten Thousands) Th (Thousands) H (Hundreds) T (Tens) O (Ones)
8 2 4 3 6 1

Year 6: 5 672 817 = 5 000 000 + 600 000 + 70 000 + 2000 + 800 + 10 + 7

M (Millions) HTh (Hundred

Thousands)

TTh (Ten Thousands) Th (Thousands) H (Hundreds) T (Tens) O (Ones)
5 6 7 2 8 1 7

Reading numbers

Children will also work on being able to read aloud a number that is written.

e.g Year 3: 456 = children would say four hundred and fifty six.

Year 4: 5628 = children would say five thousand, six hundred and twenty eight.

Year 5: 46 789 = children would say forty six thousand, seven hundred and eighty nine.

345 271 = children would say three hundred and forty five thousand, two hundred and seventy one.

Year 6: 6 892 654 = children would say six million, eight hundred and ninety two thousand, six hundred and fifty four.

Writing numbers

Children will then look at writing numbers, using words and numbers.

e.g. Year 3: 768 = children would write seven hundred and sixty eight.

Two hundred and thirty four = children would write 234.

Year 4: 8263 = children would write eight thousand, two hundred and sixty three.

Six thousand, seven hundred and twenty one = children would write 6721.

Year 5: 78 215 = children would write seventy eight thousand, two hundred and fifteen.

Fifty two thousand, six hundred and eighty nine = children would write 52 689.

234 156 = children would write two hundred and thirty four thousand, one hundred and fifty six.

Nine hundred and twenty two thousand, four hundred and twelve = children would write 922 412.

Year 6: 8 915 427 = children would write eight million, nine hundred and fifteen thousand, four hundred and twenty seven.

Seven million, one hundred and seventy six thousand, two hundred and fifty five = 7 176 255.

Important notes to remember: It is also great to try numbers with your child which include zeros within the number e.g. 608, 2305, 63 808, 204 506, 1 203 450 as this helps to ensure they understand zero is a place holder.

For example the value of the digits in 63 808 = 60 000 + 3000 + 800 + 8 and to say the number would be sixty three thousand, eight hundred and eight. Often children miss the zero out when reading and writing numbers, which results in a very different number so it is an important skill to practise. Some schools and teachers refer to zero as Zero the Hero who flies in as a place holder!

If your child is struggling with the numbers in their own year group, try the numbers in the previous year group and gradually build up from there (for year three children, try some 2 digit numbers).

Would you like more help for your child with times tables?

Help your child become speedy and confident at times tables with my FREE PDF GUIDE ‘TRICKS AND TIPS FOR BECOMING SPEEDY AT TIMES TABLES’.

  • 14 tips and tricks for learning the 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 12 times tables.
  • Plus, tips on learning times tables in a random order and answering times table questions in a test or Golden 100 challenge.

It also INCLUDES A FREE PLACE VALUE CHART to try the activities on the blog!

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Check out these other blog posts…

How to help your child with mental maths – Part 1

How to help your child with multiplication

How to help your child learn their times tables

Next time, we will look at more mental maths and place value skills.

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